A Letter to My February 2010 Self

Dear Charisse.

I have been looking for some notes on a presentation from 2007 on Multiracial Ethnic Identity Development. I clearly recall taking extensive notes, but the class only required a final presentation; that presentation was awesome and has been saved in numerous locations, including Google Drive. However, the notes were much more detailed, and not all of the content made it into the short form presentation. I have been searching for these notes for years.

I am in the process of rehashing this research for a possible book chapter on identity development, and  again I was tortured by the loss of this document. Last night, I looked through my old paperwork one more time in a futile attempt to find the hard copy. This morning, as I was sitting down to write up the proposal for the book chapter, I searched my Google Drive to pull up the PowerPoint Presentation. I clicked on the first file to appear when I searched “multiracial.”

And there were my notes.

AND THERE WERE MY NOTES!

Uploaded February 27, 2010 to a folder that, although technically related, I would not have thought to look in. I was amazed. I was shocked. I cried a little. I love you February 27, 2010 Charisse. You knew that I would need these notes and you uploaded them. I had forgotten about this until today, despite thinking about this document periodically over the past 6 years. Thank You, Thank You, Thank You.

Let’s go for a drink soon.

Love,
December 5, 2013 Charisse

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One Response to A Letter to My February 2010 Self

  1. daniel mcanulty says:

    I know and love this feeling, and it is a lot like the feeling that, I think, most programmers have when they discover that they commented their code. Because when you look back at a hash of unintelligible nonsense that, embarrassingly, despite its unreadability, you know you personally wrote – discovering a set of notes written that explain how it all work turns out to, almost invariably, be most useful to the person you last expected would need it, yourself.

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